Category Archives: Uncategorized

MikroTik LtAP – switch SIM card every X hours

If you have MikroTik LtAP with two SIM cards you can make simple scheduled task that changes currently active card with other:

Script looks like this:

:global simSlot ([/system routerboard modem print as-value]);
:if ($simSlot=”sim-slot=down”) do={:system routerboard modem set sim-slot=up; :log error message=”SIM UP active!”} else={:system routerboard modem set sim-slot=down; :log warning message=”SIM DOWN active!”}

Example (for testing purposes I have reduced time to 3 minutes but it works also with 24 hours …):
up down

 

Exchange 2010 to Exchange 2016 mailbox move useful Powershell cmdlets

It is time to migrate last Exchange 2010 servers as they are going end of support soon …
As I am doing this migrations I just wanted to put some Powershell cmdlets into this blog post that can be useful when doing it.

If you want to speed up things a bit:

New-MoveRequest -Identity “xxx@xxx.si” -TargetDatabase “DBEX1601” -Priority Emergency

If you want to check status of your requests:

Get-MoveRequest

If you want to remove completed move requests you can do:

Get-MoveRequest -MoveStatus Completed | Remove-MoveRequest

If you want to get more information about the moves you can try:

Get-MoveRequest | Get-MoveRequestStatistics | Sort-Object PercentComplete -Descending

 

Get e-mail alert for failed logon attempt on Outlook Web Access (OWA)

Just for fun I tried to establish a mechanism that will allow me to get information for failed logon attempt on Outlook Web Access (OWA).

If you open event viewer on your CAS server (where OWA is located) you can find out that failed requests are logged with Event ID 4625.
003

001
In general information you can find interesting things like – username which was used and IPv4 or IPv6 address from where the attempt was made.
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All you need to do is to Attach task to this event
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As all other actions are deprecated you should use the option to Start a program – here we will run a Powershell script to do the job.
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We need to create a PS1 (powershell script) with content:

$EventMessage = get-winevent -FilterHashtable @{Logname=’Security’;ID=4625} -MaxEvents 1 | fl TimeCreated, Message
$eventmessagetstring = $EventMessage | Out-String
$EventMessageAccountNameText3array = $EventMessagetstring | Select-String -Pattern “Account Name:\s+\S+” -AllMatches | Select -ExpandProperty matches | Select -ExpandProperty value
$EventMessageAccountNameText3 = $EventMessageAccountNameText3array[-1]
$EventMessageAccountNameText = $EventMessagetstring | Select-String -Pattern “Failure Reason:\s+\S+\s+\S+\s+\S+\s+\S+\s+\S+\s+\S+” -AllMatches | Select -ExpandProperty matches | Select -ExpandProperty value
$EventMessageAccountNameText2 = $EventMessagetstring | Select-String -Pattern “Source Network Address:\s+\S+” -AllMatches | Select -ExpandProperty matches | Select -ExpandProperty value

$EmailTo = “admin@domain.com”
$EmailFrom = “alert@domain.com”
$Subject = “OWA attack from $EventMessageAccountNameText2”
$Body = “Owa attack from: `n $EventMessageAccountNameText2 `n $EventMessageAccountNameText3 `n $EventMessageAccountNameText”
$SMTPServer = “IPOfYourSMTPServer”
$SMTPMessage = New-Object System.Net.Mail.MailMessage($EmailFrom,$EmailTo,$Subject,$Body)
$SMTPClient = New-Object Net.Mail.SmtpClient($SmtpServer, 25)
$SMTPClient.Send($SMTPMessage)

So in task properties we should choose:
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In Add arguments (optional) field we should add:

-ExecutionPolicy ByPass -File X:\PathToScript\OwaAttack.ps1

So if everything is correct – next time someone fail to enter correct password or an attack on OWA is performed you will get an e-mail like this:

006

“Demystifying” – Windows server 2012 Hyper-V 3.0 network virtualization – part III – (two hosts / two subnets)

In this part III I would like to show you how network virtualization works between two Hyper-V hosts in different subnet (in my example connected HV01 – Router (IPSec VPN) – WAN – WAN – Router (IPsec VPN) – HV02).

You can see how to do that by clicking on a link to video tutorial:
http://www.screencast.com/t/pRDC7Z4UKrg  – Hyper-V 3.0 – Network virtualization Part 4

* at 1:48 – I have already copy pasted that before – you should do it on both hosts
* at 2:04 – there is mistake as those parameters were already there so I removed them and resumed with video recording
* at 2:43 – I did not paste the second part to HV02 (I already did that in previous demo)
* at 3:59 – You will not see GRE traffic until you add Ethernet card to monitoring

In my environment I have two hyper-v hosts called HV01 (10.17.217.177 with gw 10.17.217.1 (router – that makes IPSec VPN)) and HV02 (10.17.218.177 with gw 10.17.218.1 (router – that makes IPSec VPN)).

So only Hyper-V hosts “see” each other over VPN (two different subnets).

I have used folowing powershell cmdlets:

First we need to enable ms_netwnv component on !PHYSICAL! nic – not on virtual switch NIC!
Run it on HV01 and HV02:

Enable-NetAdapterBinding “Ethernet” -ComponentID ms_netwnv

Now we create Lookup record and CustomerRoute (we use IP addresses of our virtual machines, their mac address and IP address of Hyper-V host) This is explained in my previous post.
Run it on HV01 and HV02:
New-NetVirtualizationLookupRecord -CustomerAddress “10.10.10.11” -ProviderAddress “10.17.217.177” -VirtualSubnetID “5001” -MACAddress “AAAAAAAAAA01” -Rule “TranslationMethodEncap”
New-NetVirtualizationLookupRecord -CustomerAddress “10.10.10.12” -ProviderAddress “10.17.218.177” -VirtualSubnetID “5001” -MACAddress “AAAAAAAAAA02” -Rule “TranslationMethodEncap”
New-NetVirtualizationCustomerRoute -RoutingDomainID “{11111111-2222-3333-4444-000000000000}” -VirtualSubnetID “5001” -DestinationPrefix “10.10.10.0/24” -NextHop “0.0.0.0” -Metric 255

Now only on HV01 you should configure provider address and provider route (this is how hosts will get connectivity to each other…):
New-NetVirtualizationProviderAddress -InterfaceIndex 12 -ProviderAddress “10.17.217.177” -PrefixLength 24

New-NetVirtualizationProviderRoute -InterfaceIndex 12 -DestinationPrefix “0.0.0.0/0” -NextHop “10.17.217.1”

The same thing on HV02:
New-NetVirtualizationProviderAddress -InterfaceIndex 12 -ProviderAddress “10.17.218.177” -PrefixLength 24
New-NetVirtualizationProviderRoute -InterfaceIndex 12 -DestinationPrefix “0.0.0.0/0” -NextHop “10.17.218.1”

At the end we need to add VirtualSubnetID parameter to our VM’s sitting on HV01 and on HV02

HV01 (Where Blue01 VM sits):
Get-VMNetworkAdapter -VMName Blue01 | where {$_.MacAddress -eq “AAAAAAAAAA01”} | Set-VMNetworkAdapter -VirtualSubnetID 5001

HV02 (Where Blue02 VN sits):
Get-VMNetworkAdapter -VMName Blue02 | where {$_.MacAddress -eq “AAAAAAAAAA02”} | Set-VMNetworkAdapter -VirtualSubnetID 5001

Change time sync interval in Windows server 2008 (R2)…

During regular check of my Hyper-V hosts (Windows servers 2008 (R2)) I have seen that some of them have time out of sync even if all of them have configured external NTP source (I am using pool.ntp.org – in my case si.pool.ntp.org (Slovenian pool))…

But by default Windows is making NTP query and correction every 7 days (604800 seconds :))…

Well as NTP query is from network prospective small / light I have decided to make this check and sync once per hour… (3600 seconds)…

Well where do we set up this?

The key that you need to change is located in:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESYSTEMCurrentControlSetServices
W32TimeTimeProvidersNtpClientSpecialPollInterval

Change from 604800 to 3600 (1 hour for example)… And restart Windows Time service

You can check snapshots on:
https://skydrive.live.com/?cid=38C674F31C0CB95C&id=38C674F31C0CB95C%212390#cid=38C674F31C0CB95C&id=38C674F31C0CB95C%212391